Principled Practices for Principals

In the past few months, I have presented at a couple of conferences on the topic of leadership. The primary audience at these conferences have been principals or aspiring administrators, and in my opinion, there is nothing more challenging than presenting to my peers. Principals can be an intimidating audience because they have a range of expertise and experiences. When I know I am presenting to principals, I always try to share something that causes them to reflect on their own leadership.
Screenshot 2016-06-17 20.42.41
 
When I am preparing to speak, I always have to personally reflect on who I am and what I am about as a leader. Recently, I have discovered that there are three fundamental principles that drive me as a leader.
  • Bring Value to Someone’s Life Every Day
    Being a leader is a huge responsibility. Teachers, students, and parents are watching your every move. People want to know what makes you tick as a person, and it matters to them what you think. Because of my position as a principal, I recognize that I have a responsibility to the people I serve each day. Although there are days that I fall short, I seek to add value to someone’s life each day. I am not perfect by any means, and unfortunately, I do miss opportunities. When that occurs, I constantly think about what I need to do the next time to correct the missed opportunity. If you, as the principal, are not making others who work around your better, then I question your purpose. As a leader, I see every single encounter with a student, teacher, or parent as an opportunity for transformation.
  • See the Possibilities in Every Situation
    One of the main life lessons that I learned in college was that excuses are tools of incompetence. I believe, wholeheartedly, that is my responsibility to help teachers see the possibles in every situation. Making sure teachers have the resources and training they need to do the job is my number one priority. Giving quality feedback, in a supportive learning and working environment, makes the “impossibles” become “I’m possible.” When teachers have the belief in themselves to do the work, they feel confident and equipped. If the principal does not believe the organization can be successful, then the conditions necessary for success will not be created or cultivated. Excellence cannot thrive while being surrounded by mediocre thinking; thus, being excellent involves possessing an attitude and work ethic that rises above and repels mediocrity. It is my belief that every situation has possibilities and untapped potential yet to be seen.
  • Be Excellent on Purpose
    “Excellence is not a skill. It is an attitude” (Ralph Marston). I don’t know many people who wake up each day and say, “I want to be average, below average, or completely ineffective.” Being excellent on purpose means setting a standard for success and doing whatever it takes to close the gap from where you currently are to what you are striving to become. If someone is pursuing excellence, they are able to see past the barriers that are preventing them from achieving their goals. They surround themselves with others who are going to push them and make them a better person. Seekers of excellence aspire to inspire others around them to be great. When you are excellent on purpose, you make it a priority to make others around your better by building them up instead of tearing them down. Being excellent on purpose means being intentional with your time, the company you keep, and where you focus your thinking and energy.
 
These are my leadership principles. This is what keeps me grounded in my integrity as a principal. When I deviate from these principles, I am acting outside of my integrity. Fortunately, I have surrounded myself with people who always bring me back to my practical leadership principles.

What are your leadership principles? More importantly, who have you surrounded yourself with that can keep you focused on who you are as a leader?

2 thoughts on “Principled Practices for Principals

  1. You did a great job presenting to us on Saturday Sanee and appreciated you sharing these same principles with us. Great for all educators to follow.

    Like

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