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Who is Responsible for Teacher Engagement​?

According to a 2014 survey conducted by Gallup, only 30% of teachers are engaged in their work. When I first saw this statistic, I was somewhat surprised. After reading the report further, I asked myself the following question, “Who is responsible for teacher engagement?” Before I share my thoughts on this question, I want to define the levels of engagement that were discussed in the report: engaged, not engaged, actively disengaged.

The actively disengaged employee is not only unhappy with his or her work, but they want to make sure others are unhappy and unsuccessful, too. This type of employee is a culture killer who seeks to create and spread toxic energy. They undermine any good that is occurring on a campus or in the professional lives of others. They are so miserable in their role, and probably with their life, but yet they keep hanging around instead of seeking other employment opportunities.

The employee who is not engaged can be described as being compliant. They go through the motions without any purpose or passion. They do what they are asked to do, not because they believe in it, but because they were told to do so. This type of employee is on auto pilot. They are not causing problems by rocking the boat, but they are not interested in making any positive waves. Compliant employees are not hot or cold, but can be considered to be lukewarm. With support or a nudge from the right influencer, they can move up on the employee engagement barometer.

The engaged employee is committed. They are constantly seeking to grow professionally. They own their professional learning and see the value in connecting with others to improve their craft. Engaged employees do not view the teaching profession as work. They  view their chosen profession as an ongoing passion project with endless possibilities.

1. Read more books2. Get a new hobby3. Try rock climbing4. Be more creative

If we believe that student engagement is the responsibility of the teacher, what role does the principal play when it comes to teacher engagement? Below are three suggestions for leaders about how to create a more engaging working environment for teachers.

Give teachers permission to take risks and support them when they fail. Teaching is an art and a science. I don’t know of any artist or scientist who did not fail during the artistic or scientific inquiry process. Teachers must be given the opportunity to think outside of the box as they focus on how to meet the multiple needs of the learners in their classroom. The ability to solve problems and think critically are key characteristics of risk takers, and in almost every risk, there is a high probability of failure. Failure is not the end; it is just the beginning of a breakthrough. Engaged teachers are risk takers, and they need principals who will encourage and support them in their risk taking efforts. Principals need to give them quality feedback on identified areas of growth, recognize their effort and desire to improve, and celebrate their success.

Listen to the voices of teachers. One of the main points of the study discussed the lack of teacher voice in the profession. Teachers surveyed during this study expressed that they felt their voice was not heard, and their opinions did not matter. Historically, our profession is one that follows the bureaucratic model. Typically, initiatives are top down from the federal and state government to the local agency, from the local agency to the principal, and from the principal to the teachers. Ultimately, teachers are the doers, but they are often the furthest away from the decision-making table. When rolling out campus initiatives or embarking on the change process, it is important to have teachers sitting at the table. Allow them to be part of the conversation. Listen to their suggestions, concerns, hopes, and fears. This discourse will help leaders think through the change process and make more informed decisions that impact the lives of the teachers on the campus.

Help teachers innovate inside the box. There are many aspects of schooling where educators do not have a say in what happens in public education. The role of the principal is to make sure that the campus is compliant in those areas, but it is equally important for leaders to help teachers innovate within the box. Giving teachers permission to work through the parameters that have been set, without neglecting the compliance pieces, is possible if the leader has developed a collaborative culture that values shared decision making. Shared decision making leads to a culture where teachers understand the big picture, are committed and dedicated to the work, and can see impossibles as possibles in waiting.

Strong principal leadership is a contributor to a positive, engaging working environment for teachers. In the absence of leadership, only pockets of excellence can exist. With strong leaders at the helm, systems of excellence that foster and support high teacher engagement can be created and sustained.

 

Will the Real Disruptive Educators Please Stand Up?

Originally posted on LeadUpNow

As educators when we hear the word disruptive, our minds usually reflect on students in the past who have misbehaved in school. The word disruptive often has a negative connotation associated with its use. It is synonymous with words like troublemaking, disturbing, distracting, and unruly. 

However, the beauty of the English language is that we have multiple meanings for words. When I searched Google for the meaning of disruptive, the search engine returned two meanings:

1.) causing or tending to cause disruption

“disruptive and delinquent children”

2.) innovative or groundbreaking

“breaking a disruptive technology into the market is never easy”

To frame this post, I want to focus on the second meaning of the word as I define and illustrate the meaning of a disruptive educator.Disruptive Educators (1)

Disruptors Innovate

Disruptive educators are innovators. They are chasers of the breakthrough, and they are driven by groundbreaking discoveries. They don’t know when the breakthrough may come, but they continue to disrupt the status quo in an effort to innovate. Disruptive educators are committed to radically changing our profession by creating a new way of thinking about how we educate students, and how we grow professionally. They are the early innovators and early adopters who have the courage to explore something new. Simon Sinek references the Law of Diffusion of Innovation in his How Great Leaders Inspire Action TED talk. Disruptive educators fall into the 16% of the profession who are either the innovators or who are the early adopters of the innovations.

Disruptive educators have a drive, a different speed that is driven by a purpose, an attitude, and an unrelenting sense of determination to contribute to a greater good. Being a disruptive educator is a way of life. It is a thought-process and a state-of-being. Disruptive educators are not uncomfortable with others challenging their thinking. In fact, disruptive educators welcome the challenge from those who are not quite sold on their innovative ideas. They need the early and late majority who challenge and question their innovations. It is this questioning and challenging that helps them refine and improve their thinking. If the innovation is real, it will eventually reach the tipping point and become a new way of doing business.

Disruptors Find Their People

Disruptive educators are connected. They are not lone rangers. A lone disruptor may be viewed as a nuisance, a troublemaker, or a radical who others may not take seriously; but a connected disruptor is part of a movement others want to join. Disruptive educators are contributors and collaborators. They seek to disrupt, not for notoriety or fame, but because they see a need and want to make a difference. More often than not, disruptive educators are not self-proclaimed. Others have identified them as disruptors because of their openness and willingness to share. Disruptive educators are committed to making great things happen for students. They understand that BIG things don’t happen with small thinking.

Disruptors Move Beyond the Conversation

Disruptive educators choose to be bothered and challenged by what others believe to be impossible. They have bold dreams and the courage to not only pursue their dreams but to make their dreams a reality. Disruptive educators are writing a story and acting it out simultaneously. They are key players in the story they are writing, and they live in a state of constant revision. They don’t know how the story will end, but they write the story with such purpose and passion that the journey is worth more than the final destination. They try, they fail and they try again. They are persistent, courageous, and so necessary to our profession. Disruptors not only join the conversation, but they turn the conversation into action.

The status quo is not and will not ever be good enough for me. I challenge you to change the education narrative by moving beyond the conversation of what’s wrong in schools and focus on what’s right. Focus on your circle of influence and innovate in your current setting. Disrupt yourself! Our profession and our students deserve it. 

Building Professional Capital to Impact Student Learning

A fundamental core value that I hold as a leader is that it is people, not programs that improve schools. I consider it my primary responsibility to hire well and to build the professional capital of those who are working under my leadership. I understand that the success of my school is dependent on my ability to focus on areas that make the greatest difference. Being able to do the most important things well creates the conditions that are necessary to innovate, transform, and sustain change. As a leader, I have found the following activities to be purposeful and important in creating a collaborative culture among the educators in my building:

  • Identifying student learning needs
  • Developing a strong instructional core centered around best practices
  • Providing structure and support that allows teachers to learn from each other
  • Monitoring and evaluating progress

In collaboration with my instructional coaches, I lay out the instructional focus areas for our campus. It is this focus that centers our work and drives all professional learning decisions. Since our work has been focused and intentional, teachers have had the time to grow and develop their professional capital.

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In order to move our work to the next level, I made the decision to introduce the instructional rounds practice to my teachers. I have participated in the instructional rounds process with a team of principals for the past two years, and through this collaboration, I have gained a great deal of insight about instruction and the importance of reflection. Because of my experience with this process, I wanted to create a framework for teachers that would allow them to learn from each other. The goal of the rounds process is to create the opportunity for structured discourse and reflection about our instructional practice. Another goal of the rounds process is to professionalize the role of the educators in the building.

Prior to conducting the rounds, we identify the problem of practice in which to focus our attention before we enter classrooms. The purpose of the instructional round visit is not to be judgmental about one another’s practice, but to learn from colleagues, to gain insights, new understanding, and to identify strong instructional practices. By analyzing our instructional core as a group, we are utilizing the collective expertise and experience of the group to build professional group capital.

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As a team, we review our collective agreements for how we will engage with one another during the classroom visits and during the debriefing process of those visits. Setting the stage for the day is a critical activity and a huge factor in ensuring that the instructional

rounds visit is a time for focused learning. Participating in the instructional rounds process is voluntary. Most of the participants are looking to learn how to improve their practice. After the classroom visits, the team returns to debrief and share the data collected during the rounds process. Discussions about next steps for campus professional learning, as well as personal reflection time about how their own practice will be impacted as a result of participating in the rounds process, are key areas of focus during the debrief session. At the end of the every instructional rounds visit, the feedback from the group is shared with the staff, and the leadership team analyzes the reflection sheets to identify common themes.

The benefit of implementing this work on my campus has been amazing. The collaborative learning that occurred across grade levels strengthened and added value to the professional core of my campus. Teachers are now seeking guidance from their colleagues on how to address instructional issues, and they are engaging in dialogue about professional best practices. They also felt validated about their current progress, and they are highly engaged in their work as professionals. It is unlikely that the rich dialogue and reflection that takes place at the end of the instructional rounds process would have naturally occurred if teachers had not been given the opportunity to observe and learn from each other. Building the professional capital of the teachers on my campus by empowering them to learn and share with each other positively contributed to the collaborative culture of professional learning at my school.

Resources used to move the work forward include:

How have you built the professional capital within your school? I would love to hear your thoughts.

Real Leaders Practice Vulnerability

I have had the privilege and honor of serving as the principal of Cimarron Elementary for five years. What is remarkable about my journey is that my path was not a traditional path to the elementary principal seat. In fact, prior to becoming an elementary principal, the last time I was in an elementary school was as a 5th grade student. I was never an elementary school teacher, and outside of occasionally teaching Bible class at church, I did not interact much with children under the age of 11.

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As I reflect on my time at Cimarron, what humbles me is that I went in not knowing the inner workings of an elementary school; but as I exit, I wholeheartedly believe that I am a better educator and a person because of my time spent at the elementary level. There were a number of things I did not know or understand about the elementary experience or the day-to-day logistics, systems and structures that are so critical to the daily operations. However, what I did know was how to empower those around me to not only bring out the best in themselves but how to utilize their strengths to bring out the best in me. I needed the team to help me on this leadership journey. I knew I didn’t know how to do everything, but I was confident that I could learn how to do what mattered most, which was to create an environment where teachers and students felt safe to dream, dare and thrive.

Leadership does not know levels. As educators we often put ourselves into boxes of expertise based on the certifications we hold. Our certifications make us feel safe saying, “I am an elementary person,” or “I can’t handle older kids.” We all have our personal preference when it comes to age groups or content areas, but a leader who is a learner can work out of the box when he or she is called to do so. I want to be a learner of children, not a knower of a specified age group. If I had restricted myself to only secondary level leadership, I would have missed out on the best five years of my career.

Becoming an elementary principal was the biggest act of vulnerability that I have ever practiced. I started my new role by saying to my staff, “I don’t know how to do this, and I need your help.” I showed up, and I was ready to be brave. I have a strong desire to lead, but more importantly than that desire is my heart for kids. It is my heart for kids that compelled me to challenge myself to lead at the elementary level. I focused on my strengths and surrounded myself with a team of committed staff members who helped me figure out the rest. In the beginning, I am sure there were a number of critics in the cheap seats who took bets on how long this secondary person could last in the elementary arena. In fact, some days I questioned my decision to lead at that level. But by practicing vulnerability, I was able to get people out of the stands and into the arena with me, and that made all the difference.

Behind every successful principal is a staff lifting him or her up. A leader is only as successful as their followership, and there will be no followership in the absence of leadership. My success as a principal has nothing to do with my content expertise, my meticulous analysis of data, or how well I discipline children. My success is rooted in my ability to be authentic in the pursuit of excellence. My individual success is rooted and grounded in the support and followership of my staff, students and community.

Thank you to my amazing staff at Cimarron for believing in me, following me, encouraging me, and lifting me up as your leader. I am blessed to have worked with each of you, and I am a better leader because of our time spent together.

 

 

Hard Wired & Wireless Connections

As I read my Twitter feeds daily, I come across several messages about being a connected educator. Most people immediately think about social media and its power of connecting others. While social media tools are powerful, and I certainly have benefited greatly in expanding my personal and professional connections because of the use of social media, I want to explore the power of both hardwired and wireless connections.

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Wireless

What attracts people to the use of social media? Relationships, Relationships, Relationships. People now have relationships and connectedness at their fingertips. Social media gives us the opportunity to watch the game of life from the top of the arena, usually in the cheap seats. We watch from afar, make comments, and move on to the next post. There are people behind the posts that are shared on social media outlets, and it is human nature to want to be connected with others who seem interesting and inspiring. I have used social media tools to connect personally with old and new friends and to keep in touch with family. Professionally, I have used Twitter, Voxer, LinkedIn, blogs, Pinterest and Instagram to grow professionally in my field. These tools have been great professional development resources for me and gateway tools to more in-depth personal and professional relationships.

Wired

The wired relationships that I am referring to in this post are those relationships that extend beyond 140 characters, or pictures with captions that others like, or blog posts that receive tons of positive comments. Wired relationships happen when people are playing the game of life with you instead of watching from the sideline. The wired relationships are those people you can get to rather quickly via phone, text, Vox, Google Hangout, Face Time, or even face-to-face. The wired relationships have unlimited characters and include memories you make together, rather than pictures and posts you view as a spectator. You see, wired relationships are not contingent on if the person happens to be using their social media tools that day or if they are in a place that has wifi. Wired relationships are real, organic, and go beyond the surface level. The wired relationships are the ones we turn to when we are celebrating, hurting, struggling, or just want to talk.

Interconnectedness

In my opinion, both types of connectedness are important and have served me well. I have many wireless connections that have become wired relationships. I can speak first hand to the power of social media and how it has connected me with wonderful educators and people across the world. In the same respect, most of my treasured relationships are the wonderful teachers and administrators that I work alongside each day. These are my turn to connections when I have a question or need an opinion. They are my support group and my cheerleaders. The know me beyond 140 characters and pictures, and they choose to stick around.

In a world that is instant and focused on the next best thing, it is important to water and care for the interconnected relationships that we have. Think of social media as planting the seed, it is up to us to water and care for the relationships that take root and grow. Being connected means to join together in a way that is so tight, it creates a safety net and a synergistic relationship that leads to making one another better. Connectedness is a two-way exercise. One party shouldn’t only be a taker or a giver. Connectedness goes both ways. Move beyond the 140 characters and foster those interconnected relationships. There are people around you waiting to connect. I guarantee that you will grow in ways that you would not have ever imagined!

Bring Your Best And Nothing Less

A few weeks before spring break I was approached by a 2nd grader in the hallway. He asked me the following question, “How is the principal job going?” After I chuckled, I replied, “It is fantastic! There is no other job that I would rather have more than being a principal!” He went on to tell me that he planned to work at my school when he turned 27 and asked me not to quit until he got a job. I don’t know if I can make a 20-year commitment, but I can definitely commit to bringing my best each day I walk into my school.

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How could a seven-year-old possibly know where he wants to work twenty years from now?  After thinking about it I realized that there is something that this student sees in me, his teachers, and our school that makes him want to work here 20 years from now.

As a principal, I know that what I do each day matters to lives of students, teachers, parents and our community. Sometimes I may doubt myself as a leader. I am sure we all do from time to time, but what keeps me encouraged and motivated is knowing that I matter and that my purpose in life is bigger than what can be defined and observed in 179 school days.

Our actions matter to our students. How we interact with each other matters to the culture of our school. And most importantly, what we believe about ourselves as educators matters to the success of our students. We must never forget that we are an essential piece to the success of our schools; but more importantly, we must understand and own the fact that we are an essential contributor to the lives of the children that we touch each day. One interaction, either positive or negative, can change a child’s whole world. We must know and never forget our impact!

I challenge you to bring your best every day. Our students, your colleagues, and our profession deserve it!

Evolving Role of Principal Leadership

The principal is the most visibly recognizable person in the school.  Principal leadership is the second greatest indicator of student achievement after teacher instruction. Furthermore, the principal’s ability to lead in a way that inspires and energizes teachers is critical to building successful schools. Leaders must be able to build capacity, commitment and the collective efficacy within their schools in order to ensure that teachers are fully equipped to meet the current challenges of public education.

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There is a myriad of educational research that focuses on various leadership styles and the evolving role of school principals. Most research is geared at one particular style of leadership over another; however, through my academic research and personal experience as a school principal, I believe that leaders must possess the following traits in order to meet the demands facing school leaders today:

  • Influencer
  • Capacity Builder
  • Relationship Crafter
  • Systems thinker

Influencer. The leader’s ability to establish and communicate a clear vision to followers is key to being able to motivate others to join them in realizing the vision. Leaders who are influential excite and energize followers because they are inspirational and driven. They have a can-do attitude and can see the possibilities of their organization despite the challenges and setbacks that may present themselves. Followers want to identify with a principal who demonstrates these qualities, and they place a high degree of trust and confidence in them as a leader. Influencers do not accept the status quo. They challenge the mantra “we have always done it this way.” They inspire and aspire greatness, and because of this, they serve as a model for those who follow them.

Capacity Builder. Building professional capital within an organization is a key driver for effective principal leadership. Capacity builders value learning and are not only focused on how they can help others grow, but they are committed to their own growth and development as well. Principals who are committed to developing the professional capital of the teachers in their building establish systems and structures that foster and support a culture of collaboration. An environment of this nature allows teachers to learn from and share with each other best practices and pedagogical expertise and experiences. The principal is a part of this collaborative culture and serves as the lead learner in the organization. The principal leads by ensuring that instructional best practices are researched, shared, taught and evaluated.

Relationship Crafter. Being skilled in the area of relationship building is key to moving an organization from buy-in to ownership. Principals who put an emphasis on relationships are skilled in meeting the individual needs of their employees. They approach each individual differently, which allows them to differentiate support and professional learning. Relationship crafters intentionally focus on building the culture of the organization and use the collective efficacy of the group to motivate, challenge and inspire its members.

Systems Thinker. Principals must be able to work within the greater system to meet the demands placed on public schools at the same time they are thinking and working outside of the box to innovate. Being able to see the big picture and communicate the vision so that others are inspired is a critical component of principal leadership. Recognizing complex issues and problems and how they impact the organizational system is a critical skill. Providing meaning and purpose for followers help the organization remain focused on achieving the vision despite any obstacles that may arise. Systems thinkers are able to work on the system as a whole by focusing on the key drivers that will have the greatest, sustainable impact on organizational improvement, instead of fragmented strategies that lead to short-term wins.

The role of the principal has never been more complex and more critical to the success of public schools than it is now.  With the increased measures of accountability, the varied social and emotional needs of students, being able and available to respond to the needs of teachers, parents and the community, and the other complex variables that influence public education today, leaders must have a tremendous skill set to be able to identify the right drivers in which to focus their attention and efforts.

These are the skills and traits that have helped me on my leadership journey. They are adaptable and transferable to any setting or situation. What other skills and traits can be added to the list? I would love to hear your thoughts.