Hard Wired & Wireless Connections

As I read my Twitter feeds daily, I come across several messages about being a connected educator. Most people immediately think about social media and its power of connecting others. While social media tools are powerful, and I certainly have benefited greatly in expanding my personal and professional connections because of the use of social media, I want to explore the power of both hardwired and wireless connections.

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Wireless

What attracts people to the use of social media? Relationships, Relationships, Relationships. People now have relationships and connectedness at their fingertips. Social media gives us the opportunity to watch the game of life from the top of the arena, usually in the cheap seats. We watch from afar, make comments, and move on to the next post. There are people behind the posts that are shared on social media outlets, and it is human nature to want to be connected with others who seem interesting and inspiring. I have used social media tools to connect personally with old and new friends and to keep in touch with family. Professionally, I have used Twitter, Voxer, LinkedIn, blogs, Pinterest and Instagram to grow professionally in my field. These tools have been great professional development resources for me and gateway tools to more in-depth personal and professional relationships.

Wired

The wired relationships that I am referring to in this post are those relationships that extend beyond 140 characters, or pictures with captions that others like, or blog posts that receive tons of positive comments. Wired relationships happen when people are playing the game of life with you instead of watching from the sideline. The wired relationships are those people you can get to rather quickly via phone, text, Vox, Google Hangout, Face Time, or even face-to-face. The wired relationships have unlimited characters and include memories you make together, rather than pictures and posts you view as a spectator. You see, wired relationships are not contingent on if the person happens to be using their social media tools that day or if they are in a place that has wifi. Wired relationships are real, organic, and go beyond the surface level. The wired relationships are the ones we turn to when we are celebrating, hurting, struggling, or just want to talk.

Interconnectedness

In my opinion, both types of connectedness are important and have served me well. I have many wireless connections that have become wired relationships. I can speak first hand to the power of social media and how it has connected me with wonderful educators and people across the world. In the same respect, most of my treasured relationships are the wonderful teachers and administrators that I work alongside each day. These are my turn to connections when I have a question or need an opinion. They are my support group and my cheerleaders. The know me beyond 140 characters and pictures, and they choose to stick around.

In a world that is instant and focused on the next best thing, it is important to water and care for the interconnected relationships that we have. Think of social media as planting the seed, it is up to us to water and care for the relationships that take root and grow. Being connected means to join together in a way that is so tight, it creates a safety net and a synergistic relationship that leads to making one another better. Connectedness is a two-way exercise. One party shouldn’t only be a taker or a giver. Connectedness goes both ways. Move beyond the 140 characters and foster those interconnected relationships. There are people around you waiting to connect. I guarantee that you will grow in ways that you would not have ever imagined!

Bring Your Best And Nothing Less

A few weeks before spring break I was approached by a 2nd grader in the hallway. He asked me the following question, “How is the principal job going?” After I chuckled, I replied, “It is fantastic! There is no other job that I would rather have more than being a principal!” He went on to tell me that he planned to work at my school when he turned 27 and asked me not to quit until he got a job. I don’t know if I can make a 20-year commitment, but I can definitely commit to bringing my best each day I walk into my school.

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How could a seven-year-old possibly know where he wants to work twenty years from now?  After thinking about it I realized that there is something that this student sees in me, his teachers, and our school that makes him want to work here 20 years from now.

As a principal, I know that what I do each day matters to lives of students, teachers, parents and our community. Sometimes I may doubt myself as a leader. I am sure we all do from time to time, but what keeps me encouraged and motivated is knowing that I matter and that my purpose in life is bigger than what can be defined and observed in 179 school days.

Our actions matter to our students. How we interact with each other matters to the culture of our school. And most importantly, what we believe about ourselves as educators matters to the success of our students. We must never forget that we are an essential piece to the success of our schools; but more importantly, we must understand and own the fact that we are an essential contributor to the lives of the children that we touch each day. One interaction, either positive or negative, can change a child’s whole world. We must know and never forget our impact!

I challenge you to bring your best every day. Our students, your colleagues, and our profession deserve it!

Evolving Role of Principal Leadership

The principal is the most visibly recognizable person in the school.  Principal leadership is the second greatest indicator of student achievement after teacher instruction. Furthermore, the principal’s ability to lead in a way that inspires and energizes teachers is critical to building successful schools. Leaders must be able to build capacity, commitment and the collective efficacy within their schools in order to ensure that teachers are fully equipped to meet the current challenges of public education.

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There is a myriad of educational research that focuses on various leadership styles and the evolving role of school principals. Most research is geared at one particular style of leadership over another; however, through my academic research and personal experience as a school principal, I believe that leaders must possess the following traits in order to meet the demands facing school leaders today:

  • Influencer
  • Capacity Builder
  • Relationship Crafter
  • Systems thinker

Influencer. The leader’s ability to establish and communicate a clear vision to followers is key to being able to motivate others to join them in realizing the vision. Leaders who are influential excite and energize followers because they are inspirational and driven. They have a can-do attitude and can see the possibilities of their organization despite the challenges and setbacks that may present themselves. Followers want to identify with a principal who demonstrates these qualities, and they place a high degree of trust and confidence in them as a leader. Influencers do not accept the status quo. They challenge the mantra “we have always done it this way.” They inspire and aspire greatness, and because of this, they serve as a model for those who follow them.

Capacity Builder. Building professional capital within an organization is a key driver for effective principal leadership. Capacity builders value learning and are not only focused on how they can help others grow, but they are committed to their own growth and development as well. Principals who are committed to developing the professional capital of the teachers in their building establish systems and structures that foster and support a culture of collaboration. An environment of this nature allows teachers to learn from and share with each other best practices and pedagogical expertise and experiences. The principal is a part of this collaborative culture and serves as the lead learner in the organization. The principal leads by ensuring that instructional best practices are researched, shared, taught and evaluated.

Relationship Crafter. Being skilled in the area of relationship building is key to moving an organization from buy-in to ownership. Principals who put an emphasis on relationships are skilled in meeting the individual needs of their employees. They approach each individual differently, which allows them to differentiate support and professional learning. Relationship crafters intentionally focus on building the culture of the organization and use the collective efficacy of the group to motivate, challenge and inspire its members.

Systems Thinker. Principals must be able to work within the greater system to meet the demands placed on public schools at the same time they are thinking and working outside of the box to innovate. Being able to see the big picture and communicate the vision so that others are inspired is a critical component of principal leadership. Recognizing complex issues and problems and how they impact the organizational system is a critical skill. Providing meaning and purpose for followers help the organization remain focused on achieving the vision despite any obstacles that may arise. Systems thinkers are able to work on the system as a whole by focusing on the key drivers that will have the greatest, sustainable impact on organizational improvement, instead of fragmented strategies that lead to short-term wins.

The role of the principal has never been more complex and more critical to the success of public schools than it is now.  With the increased measures of accountability, the varied social and emotional needs of students, being able and available to respond to the needs of teachers, parents and the community, and the other complex variables that influence public education today, leaders must have a tremendous skill set to be able to identify the right drivers in which to focus their attention and efforts.

These are the skills and traits that have helped me on my leadership journey. They are adaptable and transferable to any setting or situation. What other skills and traits can be added to the list? I would love to hear your thoughts.