What Are You Trying To Measure?

I recently read an article written by a poet who struggled to answer questions on a Texas standardized test. As the author, one would think that she would be able to analyze and answer questions about poems she wrote. I found this article to be amusing, sad, and full of common sense wisdom. I read this article two days before the state of Texas released a model of district and campus A-F ratings to meet the legislative requirement of HB 2804.

Even in the midst of standardization and scrutiny of public education, which comes mostly from those who have never set foot in public schools, educators around the world are working hard to create memorable learning experiences that cannot be standardized or measured on a test.

A student at my school drew this picture from a photograph that was given to her by one of her teachers. The artistic talent that is displayed in this drawing blew my mind! How can this be the work of a 14-year-old self-taught artist?

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When I saw this student during the passing period the next day, I complimented her artistic ability and workmanship. I also asked her what her fee would be for drawing a portrait of my children. At the conclusion of our conversation, I shared an idea with her that I had about creating a piece of art to remember our dear counselor who passed away in the fall. I already had a meeting scheduled with Andrew, the artist I use often, but I felt that having a student create the piece would be more meaningful. This student has proven to be a serious artist, and I know that she is more than capable of doing an exceptional job.

During my meeting with Andrew, I showed him the picture above and he was amazed. I went on to inform him that I had just reassigned a job I had slated for him to complete to my student artist. We continued our meeting, which led to us walking the building to look at some areas we had in mind for some upcoming projects. During our walk, we ran into the student artist we had discussed earlier. The conversation that transpired between the two artists was AMAZING! A student with a dream talking to a person who is living his dream of making a living sharing his passion and talent is what school should be about. This is learning. Schooling in the 21st century is about the possibilities and the realization of dreams, not how quickly content and strategies can be regurgitated to pass a test.

At the conclusion of the conversation, my student artist said that having the opportunity to talk to an artist who uses his talent to make a living was an answer to her prayers. She shared with us that she had been talking to her mother about what a future career would look like as an artist. I told her that with a little guidance and support, she could be a 14-year-old entrepreneur today! Her eyes popped out of her sockets, and she grinned from ear to ear. Passionate students, with the right influences and relationships, pursue excellence that positively contributes to making the world a better place. I am not sure what learning objective that is, but that is what I want my personal children to learn after 13 years of public education.

How would you measure the moment this student had? What letter grade can we put on this experience? Which experience would you want to have as a student? Furthermore, which experience do you want your children to have? I don’t know about you, but my school, my children’s school, my district, and my neighborhood are so much more than a letter grade. My children and the children I serve each day are greater than what a standardized test can measure, and the professionals who chose our worthy profession deserve more than a letter to measure their effectiveness, commitment, and dedication.

At the time when we need to be helping students find their passion and talents so they are equipped to tackle the complex problems of the 21st century, and are prepared for jobs that do not yet exist, we are using the most simplistic form of measurement to determine if they are ready. For those who need to measure the effectiveness of public schools, I would encourage you to choose your metrics wisely. Be sure your metrics can easily be explained, replicated, and not manipulated. As for me, I will take my chance on passion, creativity, personal stories, and connection over a letter grade any day.

Evolving Role of Principal Leadership

The principal is the most visibly recognizable person in the school.  Principal leadership is the second greatest indicator of student achievement after teacher instruction. Furthermore, the principal’s ability to lead in a way that inspires and energizes teachers is critical to building successful schools. Leaders must be able to build capacity, commitment and the collective efficacy within their schools in order to ensure that teachers are fully equipped to meet the current challenges of public education.

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There is a myriad of educational research that focuses on various leadership styles and the evolving role of school principals. Most research is geared at one particular style of leadership over another; however, through my academic research and personal experience as a school principal, I believe that leaders must possess the following traits in order to meet the demands facing school leaders today:

  • Influencer
  • Capacity Builder
  • Relationship Crafter
  • Systems thinker

Influencer. The leader’s ability to establish and communicate a clear vision to followers is key to being able to motivate others to join them in realizing the vision. Leaders who are influential excite and energize followers because they are inspirational and driven. They have a can-do attitude and can see the possibilities of their organization despite the challenges and setbacks that may present themselves. Followers want to identify with a principal who demonstrates these qualities, and they place a high degree of trust and confidence in them as a leader. Influencers do not accept the status quo. They challenge the mantra “we have always done it this way.” They inspire and aspire greatness, and because of this, they serve as a model for those who follow them.

Capacity Builder. Building professional capital within an organization is a key driver for effective principal leadership. Capacity builders value learning and are not only focused on how they can help others grow, but they are committed to their own growth and development as well. Principals who are committed to developing the professional capital of the teachers in their building establish systems and structures that foster and support a culture of collaboration. An environment of this nature allows teachers to learn from and share with each other best practices and pedagogical expertise and experiences. The principal is a part of this collaborative culture and serves as the lead learner in the organization. The principal leads by ensuring that instructional best practices are researched, shared, taught and evaluated.

Relationship Crafter. Being skilled in the area of relationship building is key to moving an organization from buy-in to ownership. Principals who put an emphasis on relationships are skilled in meeting the individual needs of their employees. They approach each individual differently, which allows them to differentiate support and professional learning. Relationship crafters intentionally focus on building the culture of the organization and use the collective efficacy of the group to motivate, challenge and inspire its members.

Systems Thinker. Principals must be able to work within the greater system to meet the demands placed on public schools at the same time they are thinking and working outside of the box to innovate. Being able to see the big picture and communicate the vision so that others are inspired is a critical component of principal leadership. Recognizing complex issues and problems and how they impact the organizational system is a critical skill. Providing meaning and purpose for followers help the organization remain focused on achieving the vision despite any obstacles that may arise. Systems thinkers are able to work on the system as a whole by focusing on the key drivers that will have the greatest, sustainable impact on organizational improvement, instead of fragmented strategies that lead to short-term wins.

The role of the principal has never been more complex and more critical to the success of public schools than it is now.  With the increased measures of accountability, the varied social and emotional needs of students, being able and available to respond to the needs of teachers, parents and the community, and the other complex variables that influence public education today, leaders must have a tremendous skill set to be able to identify the right drivers in which to focus their attention and efforts.

These are the skills and traits that have helped me on my leadership journey. They are adaptable and transferable to any setting or situation. What other skills and traits can be added to the list? I would love to hear your thoughts.